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Thanks to Mike Anderson for reminding me that you can also subscribe to the ESV audio podcast in such a way that it coincides with the reading schedules. Here’s how to subscribe to this in iTunes:

  1. Go to the ESV Reading Plans page.
  2. Right-click (Ctrl-click on a Mac) the “RSS” link of the feed you want.
  3. Choose “Copy Link Location” or “Copy Shortcut.”
  4. Start iTunes.
  5. Choose Advanced > Subscribe to Podcast
  6. Paste the URL from step three into the box.
  7. Click OK.
I really believe in the value of not just reading, but hearing, God’s Word. Here’s something from a post I wrote last year:

In listening to an old lecture recently by J. I. Packer, he made the comment that it was not until after the 17th century (as far as he could tell) that people started doing silent prayers and reading as opposed to praying and reading out loud.

For most evangelicals, silence represents the vast majority of our reading and praying. But I wonder if that’s to our detriment. One of the great enemies to Bible reading and praying is a wandering mind—and one of the great ways to make your mind wander is to do everything in your mind without involving your voice and ears!

. . . Here’s something else to consider: the entire Bible on audio is usually about 75 hours (or 4500 minutes). If you commute to work 5 days a week, that’s about 260 days a year. And if it takes you, say, 17 minutes to commute each way to work—and if you listen to the Bible on audio during your drive each way—you’ll get through the entire Bible twice in a year.


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16 thoughts on “ESV Reading Plans as Podcasts”

  1. Daniel says:

    Very excited to hear that the reading plan was available as a podcast, unfortunately when you listen to it in iTunes the first word of a verse is often cutoff :-(

  2. Kim says:

    Thanks for sharing this. I didn’t know about the podcasts.

  3. David says:

    Just a thought, but in today’s culture, music and audio are often background noise. Unless one is intentionally listening to an audio Bible, multi-tasking habits usually kick in, and when that occurs, listening to the Bible while driving is no better than listening to another radio station – often without focus.

    However, if your commute or travel is by plane, bus, subway, or some other form of transportation in which you are a passenger, then I see great value in spending your time listening to the Bible.

  4. Dan says:

    Does Crossway/GNPCB offer an XML link for non-iPod MP3 users? The above address did not work for me.

  5. Yasmin says:

    Great highlight! I used the ESV podcast the whole of this year and it was very helpful; I plan to do it again in the new year

  6. Patrick Chan says:

    In listening to an old lecture recently by J. I. Packer, he made the comment that it was not until after the 17th century (as far as he could tell) that people started doing silent prayers and reading as opposed to praying and reading out loud.

    Sorry to nitpick, but there seems to be some debate over this – for e.g., see here.

    Of course, whether or not this was the case, it doesn’t change your good point that it’d be to our benefit to hear God’s Word read aloud.

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Justin Taylor, PhD


Justin Taylor is executive vice president of book publishing and book publisher for Crossway and blogs at Between Two Worlds. You can follow him on Twitter.

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