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Albert Mohler’s comments are worth quoting at length:

Does God hate Haiti? That is the conclusion reached by many, who point to the earthquake as a sign of God’s direct and observable judgment.

God does judge the nations — all of them — and God will judge the nations. His judgment is perfect and his justice is sure. He rules over all the nations and his sovereign will is demonstrated in the rising and falling of nations and empires and peoples. Every molecule of matter obeys his command, and the earthquakes reveal his reign — as do the tides of relief and assistance flowing into Haiti right now.

A faithful Christian cannot accept the claim that God is a bystander in world events. The Bible clearly claims the sovereign rule of God over all his creation, all of the time. We have no right to claim that God was surprised by the earthquake in Haiti, or to allow that God could not have prevented it from happening.

God’s rule over creation involves both direct and indirect acts, but his rule is constant. The universe, even after the consequences of the Fall, still demonstrates the character of God in all its dimensions, objects, and occurrences. And yet, we have no right to claim that we know why a disaster like the earthquake in Haiti happened at just that place and at just that moment.

The arrogance of human presumption is a real and present danger. We can trace the effects of a drunk driver to a car accident, but we cannot trace the effects of voodoo to an earthquake — at least not so directly. Will God judge Haiti for its spiritual darkness? Of course. Is the judgment of God something we can claim to understand in this sense — in the present? No, we are not given that knowledge. Jesus himself warned his disciples against this kind of presumption.

Why did no earthquake shake Nazi Germany? Why did no tsunami swallow up the killing fields of Cambodia? Why did Hurricane Katrina destroy far more evangelical churches than casinos? Why do so many murderous dictators live to old age while many missionaries die young?

Does God hate Haiti? God hates sin, and will punish both individual sinners and nations. But that means that every individual and every nation will be found guilty when measured by the standard of God’s perfect righteousness. God does hate sin, but if God merely hated Haiti, there would be no missionaries there; there would be no aid streaming to the nation; there would be no rescue efforts — there would be no hope.

The earthquake in Haiti, like every other earthly disaster, reminds us that creation groans under the weight of sin and the judgment of God. This is true for every cell in our bodies, even as it is for the crust of the earth at every point on the globe. The entire cosmos awaits the revelation of the glory of the coming Lord. Creation cries out for the hope of the New Creation.

In other words, the earthquake reminds us that the Gospel of Jesus Christ is the only real message of hope. The cross of Christ declares that Jesus loves Haiti — and the Haitian people are the objects of his love. Christ would have us show the Haitian nation his love, and share his Gospel. In the midst of this unspeakable tragedy, Christ would have us rush to aid the suffering people of Haiti, and rush to tell the Haitian people of his love, his cross, and salvation in his name alone.

Everything about the tragedy in Haiti points to our need for redemption. This tragedy may lead to a new openness to the Gospel among the Haitian people. That will be to the glory of God. In the meantime, Christ’s people must do everything we can to alleviate the suffering, bind up the wounded, and comfort the grieving. If Christ’s people are called to do this, how can we say that God hates Haiti?

If you have any doubts about this, take your Bible and turn to John 3:16. For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life. That is God’s message to Haiti.


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59 thoughts on “Does God Hate Haiti?”

  1. donsands says:

    Well done Al Mohler. I have been going back and forth with this whole thing, and now I have come to have a settled heart. Good teaching. Thanks.

  2. Don Coldwell says:

    That was perfectly said Mr. Mohler.

    Thank you Mr. Taylor for sharing this. I pray that this receives the ammount of traffic as that ‘other’ guy got on twitter.

  3. Now there’s a Christian response, unlike Mr. Robertson’s remarks.

  4. John says:

    Great. I love how Mohler is able to acknowledge that God did this. One thing that I hate is when people say “God had nothing to do with this.” How does that statement give any hope to anyone? Evil is not ultimate. This is God’s world, not ours.

    Most importantly Mohler manages to speak clearly on how the gospel applies to this tragedy. The real problem is sin, and our sin, and corporate sin, and the solution for all this is Christ and Him Crucified.

  5. Alicia says:

    I LOVE the comparison to Nazi Germany. You sure showed Pat Robertson!

  6. Rob French says:

    I believe that one thing that would help us all think more like Rev. Mohler is, when we start thinking of nations in the context of theology, to consider just two nations (or sets of nations): the kingdom/nation of God’s people–the church–and the nations of the world. The nations of the world, including Haiti, will all pass away one day, while the church will exist forever. In the time of our “exile” here on earth, while we yet live among the nations of the world, we should pray and work for the good of the nations in which we live, just as Israel of old, exiled in Babylon and elsewhere, was to pray for the cities and nations in which they lived. (Jeremiah 29:7)

  7. David says:

    Nazi Germany ended up getting crushed, and the countries that had not opposed that evil earlier were subjected to bloodshed the world had never before seen.

    Habakkuk asked the same question regarding Israel…wasn’t Israel “better” than their attackers? And yet there was judgment – for both.

    Additionally, we all seem to value life absolutely as compared valuing righteous living….strange for Christians to do that.

    Stephen died relatively young…is that a shame? No. Why?

    Some terrorists die relatively young in war…is that a shame? Perhaps, if you consider their way of life the shameful thing, but that wickedness has been rid of is not shameful.

    Is it a shame that perhaps thousands of Christians died in this earthquake? Is not God their Father who allows not one hair of their heads to perish?

    One of the best Scriptures to lure us toward a right understanding of death and dying is Isaiah 57:1-2.

    “The righteous perish,
    and no one ponders it in his heart;
    devout men are taken away,
    and no one understands
    that the righteous are taken away
    to be spared from evil.

    2 Those who walk uprightly
    enter into peace;
    they find rest as they lie in death.

    It is not always the “when” or “how” of dying that is important. A long life can be both good and bad depending of how one lives – by faith(?).

    1. Jeff says:

      I agree. I do believe it was God’s judgment because to do this for any other reason is unjust and God is not unjust. I believe however that His judgment sometimes is also mercy. This earthquake shows those in Haiti that God is on the thrown and that they need Him right now. The majority had forgotten and many lost their lives because of sin but like many times before the church is now stepping forth to proclaim the Lord’s salvation is available and showing it with love.

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  9. Mike Garner says:

    Such a good message here. Well said Al Mohler! And thanks for reproducing it JT!

  10. Jen says:

    My husband and I were talking about this yesterday. Yes, God is in control but somethings in this world just happen. God allows it to happen and yes He could have prevented it. But, I feel that God follows the “laws of nature” (for lack of a better term) that He has put in place.

    Also, Jesus tells us in Matthew 6:1-4, “Take heed that you do not do your charitable deeds before men, to be seen by them. Otherwise you have no reward from your Father in heaven. Therefore, when you do a charitable deed, do not sound a trumpet before you as the hypocrites do in the synagogues and in the streets, that they may have glory from men. Assuredly, I say to you, they have their reward. But when you do a charitable deed, do not let your left hand know what your right hand is doing, that your charitable deed may be in secret; and your Father who sees in secret will Himself reward you openly.” Basically, we will get our reward for our good/charitable deeds once we get to heaven (if you don’t gloat about what you’ve done before then). Why wouldn’t it be the same for punishment? God’s punishment is not and will not be earthly. God’s punishment is more than an earthquake, hurricane, tsunami, etc….God’s punishment for sin is eternal hell. Of course unless you repent and accept Jesus as your savior. Although God can and does use what happens on earth as a warning.

    What we need to be doing right now is praying for all those affected by the earthquake in Haiti and doing anything we can to help. Pray that God comforts them in a way that only He can.

    Just my two cents.

    1. I have to disagree, I believe that God is absolutely sovereign over creation and so, had He wanted to prevent this earth quake, He could have done it with His eyes closed. Jesus turned water into wine, stops storms etc. preventing an earthquake is child’s play for the God who holds the universe in His hand.

      I appreciate Al Mohler’s response but I still think that probably one of the best responses I’ve heard to questions like this was by John Piper. It was a radio interview in which he had been asked to give a Christian response and he spoke of the tower of Siloam and basically said, “I don’t understand it but I know God did it and every one should be taking heed and saying why should that not happen to me (since I too am a sinner)?” and he ended up calling for repentance.

      Remember that Romans 8:28 tells us that God must be active in every action in the universe so that all things may work together for good.

  11. Suzanne says:

    Why is it that Pat Robertson puts his foot in his mouth more often than nought??? Al Mohler should be the news anchor on 700 club rather than Pat Robertson….he gives Christians a bad rap.

  12. AlibiSW says:

    “spiritual darkness”?
    THAT is ignorant, rude and intolerant.
    shame on you!

  13. Thank you for posting this Mr. Taylor and for writing it Dr. Mohler! My favorite paragraph “In other words, the earthquake reminds us that the Gospel of Jesus Christ is the only real message of hope. The cross of Christ declares that Jesus loves Haiti — and the Haitian people are the objects of his love. Christ would have us show the Haitian nation his love, and share his Gospel. In the midst of this unspeakable tragedy, Christ would have us rush to aid the suffering people of Haiti, and rush to tell the Haitian people of his love, his cross, and salvation in his name alone.”

  14. Niles says:

    One great point that I appreciate him saying is:
    “God does hate sin, but if God merely hated Haiti, there would be no missionaries there; there would be no aid streaming to the nation; there would be no rescue efforts — there would be no hope.”

  15. Niles says:

    I just looked into Robertson’s remarks… found them disturbing and embarassing to the name of Jesus – unlike Dr. Mohler’s, who highlights Christ ultimately in his response instead of other people’s sin. But I also watched the Hatian Ambassador’s response. Did any of you? If you did, did you notice that he didn’t deny that the Hatians made a pact with the devil… He just talked about how much this deal with that devil afforded America. Strange…

  16. Mari says:

    All things work together for good of those who love the Lord and are called according to his purpose. Rom 8:28

    This verse gives us hope even in times of troubles.

    The reason why hatii was struck by that devastating earthquake and why any disaster can strike anywhere is because of sin that is why we who know the truth must not compromise because there is a real heaven and a real hell. We must once again become our brothers keepers even when they donot want us to be. Blessing

  17. Marilyn says:

    “Will God judge Haiti for its spiritual darkness? Of course.”

    Agreed, but I also believe that God will judge the French for leaving Haitian slaves on the island – with no visible means of support – when the plantation economy collapsed.

  18. Mardochee says:

    Luke 13:1-5
    Jesus says it all. Thank you Al Mohler for the great biblical insight. Unlike Pat!

  19. Angela says:

    These are the exact words that I am hoping will reach the hearts of my friends that are in the “this is God’s wrath on Haiti” camp. I shared the link to this post with them and I’m praying it will give them, and all of us, the right mind/heart/hands & feet regarding this very sad event.

  20. Alfredo says:

    this was a great article by Dr. Mohler, we need this type of response when tragedies occur around the world instead Mr. Paterson’s remarks which were insensitive and inflammatory toward the Haitian people

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  22. Alex says:

    What happened in Haiti was a result of GEOLOGY not THEOLOGY.
    Pat Robertson again shows that Christianity’s worst enemy is still loudmouth “Christians”….
    We need to pray for and reach out to people, not justify tragedy in their lives with “reasons according to scriptures”, as if we could know them…
    “His ways are not our ways, his thoughts are not our thoughts”…quit trying to understand that which is beyond our conception.
    Accept him, do his work, and pray for those around you…that’s quite enough.

  23. a fellow human says:

    I think a more important question for Christians is, given what we know about the situation, would God be justified in causing (or failing to prevent it)?

    It is true that there could be some ultimate justification, and that all evil leads to good, but possibility is not sufficient justification for belief. It is also possible that all good leads to evil, but, likewise, its possibility is not a sufficient ground for belief. Alternatively, beliefs should be based on and held in proportion to the evidence we have. The following seem to be a reasonable set of possibilities:

    1. The event one was merely geological, and one over which God had not power, in which case it is tragic and God is not omnipotent.
    2. The event is one which God had the power to stop but did not. If so, then either (a) God should have stopped it but did not, or (b) he should not have and he did not. If (a), then God is not beneficent. If (b), then there is some justification, but it we clearly do not have access to any such justification, as we would condemn any human who we found to have caused or failed to prevent the disaster. However, if (b) is true, then the earthquake was not a bad thing. If God justifiably allows such things to occur, then this situation is not tragic or bad, and we are mistaken if we think it is.

    I would also point out that it is almost a statistical certainty that non-believers died. If you are a Christian, then you must believe that these individuals are now (and will be forever) experiencing agony in Hell. Had this event not happened, they all would have had more opportunities and choices to escape this terrible fate.

    Also, if you have any doubts about this I would suggest you think about it honestly and deeply. I suspect that God would prefer this to escaping the difficulty of these questions by turning to a feel-good verse.

  24. donsands says:

    “However, if (b) is true, then the earthquake was not a bad thing. If God justifiably allows such things to occur, then this situation is not tragic or bad, and we are mistaken if we think it is.”

    “Whoever mocks the poor insults his Maker;
    he who is glad at calamity will not go unpunished.” Prov. 17:5

    “And the Lord was sorry that he had made man on the earth, and it grieved him to his heart.” Gen 6:7

    I have a heavy heart for Haiti. Actually, I don’t have a heavy enough heart really.

    I hope you are grieving fellow human.

    1. a fellow human says:

      Donsands,

      I did not say (b) was true, but that it is a possibility within a limited set of possibilities. Your response is an example of the feel-good verse response that evades the questions. If God chose to have this happen rather than to have it not happen, then it must be justified, and be better that it happened. If it is better that it happened, then the appearance that it would have been better if it had not happened must be a mistaken view.

      Gen:6:7 implies that God is not all knowing. If he was all-knowing then presumably he would not do something he would later be sorry that he did. Being sorry implies making a mistake, and perfect beings don’t make mistakes.

  25. robert says:

    i wish i could remember the passage.
    in the gospels when the disciples ask jesus about what had caused some people in another place to die in a disaster and jesus responded, oh so like jesus, when he told them that the disciples should repent lest they meet the same fate. i probably murdered the passage but i hope it makes enough sense

    1. a fellow human says:

      Robert, that sounds like a threat: stop asking questions about justice regarding your fellow man or you will be personally punished.

      1. Kyle Huckeba says:

        its funny how you get butt hurt when someone questions a situation. You can’t except what he is saying and you get all defensive. You even judged him,
        “stop asking questions about justice regarding your fellow man or you will be personally punished”
        are you god? i am pretty sure that you placed judgement on him…

    2. There were some present at that very time who told him about the Galileans whose blood Pilate had mingled with their sacrifices. And he answered them, “Do you think that these Galileans were worse sinners than all the other Galileans, because they suffered in this way? No, I tell you; but unless you repent, you will all likewise perish. Or those eighteen on whom the tower in Siloam fell and killed them: do you think that they were worse offenders than all the others who lived in Jerusalem? No, I tell you; but unless you repent, you will all likewise perish.
      (Luke 13:1-5)

  26. donsands says:

    “Your response is an example of the feel-good verse response that evades the questions.”

    No it’s not.

    The verses are what they are, the truth. Truth is what it is. God’s Word has all authority, not our minds.
    God was grieved [astab]. He was sorry that He had to destroy mankind. Did He know He would do this, before He even created the world? Yes. He knew Adam would sin, and ultimately fall from His grace, and God would curse the world, but at the same time God was grieved in His heart that Adam disobeyed. Adam was the first son of God. Luke 3:38 And God loved him.

    Also how do you interpret Prov. 17:5b: “he who is glad at calamity will not go unpunished.” ?

    1. a fellow human says:

      Donsands,

      You are playing with words. Please explain how we could possibly have any conception of “God’s Word” independently without the use of our minds. If our minds have no authority then we would have no means by which to discern what is and is not true, including God’s word. Alternatively, if you think our minds do have authority, then you are taking the easy way out by choosing not to think difficult questions.

      I would interpret Prov. 17:5b as being inconsistent with the notion that individuals can be forgiven and thereby avoid punishment.

      You can take the route that God allowed, and knew that Adam would sin, catastrophes would happen, etc, but such a conclusion precludes the possibility of God having had the power to bring about a better situation in which such things were avoided. That puts a limit on God’s power. I’m not sure if you want to do that.

      1. Logical fallacy – what you’ve just done is said, “can God make a rock so big that even He can’t lift it” by saying, “such a conclusion precludes the possibility of God having had the power to bring about a better situation in which such things were avoided. That puts a limit on God’s power.”

  27. I have two questions, one topical and one technical:

    (1) I’ve read Mohler’s comments several times and they seem ambiguous (at best). What was the answer to his own question? Yes? No? Maybe? Or, mankind can’t answer such questions.

    (2) Technical question: Some posts are nothing more than the article’s title with ellipses around it. What are they?

  28. I want to clarify my question: Was Mr. Mohler saying God did or didn’t punish Haiti with this earthquake?

  29. donsands says:

    I would think Dr. Mohler was saying it is God’s earth. He is sovereign. That he loves Haiit, and that we need to help these poor people, who have been devastated.

    It’s a huge horror, but not unlike the parable Jesus has told us:

    “A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and he fell among robbers, who stripped him and beat him and departed, leaving him half dead. Now by chance a priest was going down that road, and when he saw him he passed by on the other side. So likewise a Levite, when he came to the place and saw him, passed by on the other side. But a Samaritan, as he journeyed, came to where he was, and when he saw him, he had compassion. He went to him and bound up his wounds, pouring on oil and wine. Then he set him on his own animal and brought him to an inn and took care of him. And the next day he took out two denarii and gave them to the innkeeper, saying, ‘Take care of him, and whatever more you spend, I will repay you when I come back.’”

  30. Lorrene Goodman says:

    The whole Bible contains facts about the “End Times;” especially the prophets of the Old Testament, and the entire New Testament, including Matthew to Revelation. To find the answers we seek here we must all read and study God’s Word. He is omnipotent nd we aren’t.

  31. Byron says:

    That xplains a lot, thank you.

  32. donsands says:

    Hey Kyle you have some big time issues. You need to read the Bible for yourself, and seek the truth my friend.

    1. Kyle Huckeba says:

      So do you mean that fairytale book that was written by man and has so many inconsistencies that you christians refuse to see? I promise you, i grew up as a very active christian. Then i watched my church fall apart because of Youth pastors touching girls innappropriately, the founders weren’t paying their taxes and then telling everyone that they need to tithe so go can bless them. Everyone has their little secrets and those always seem to be what they preach against. So back to the bible thing. I am not ignorant on the things in the bible. But just like you can’t trust people nowadays, you can’t just believe some primitive man who barely had any sort of an education. Its a joke to think a man lived in a fish for three days. Come on grow up! Do you believe in santa? I don’t think so. here are just a few things that make absolutely no sense. This is just a couple of atleast a hundred.
      GE 1:3-5 On the first day, God created light, then separated light and darkness.
      GE 1:14-19 The sun (which separates night and day) wasn’t created until the fourth day.

      GE 1:11-12, 26-27 Trees were created before man was created.
      GE 2:4-9 Man was created before trees were created.

      GE 1:20-21, 26-27 Birds were created before man was created.
      GE 2:7, 19 Man was created before birds were created.

      GE 1:24-27 Animals were created before man was created.
      GE 2:7, 19 Man was created before animals were created.

      GE 1:26-27 Man and woman were created at the same time.
      GE 2:7, 21-22 Man was created first, woman sometime later.

      These sort of things happen all the way to Revelations. So Donsands, you say i have some big time issues, you judgmental piece of fuckin garbage. YOU NEED TO READ THE BIBLE AND UNDERSTAND THAT ITS FULL OF BULLSHIT.

      One last thing, how do you know what the truth is? Have you met god? Have you seen him? I don’t mean see him through petty little things you call miracles such as asking for rain and it raining. I mean have you seen or met this so called god of yours. If it is the truth, would you strap on a bomb to kill those judged by god? Cause i know of a religion that would and who are you to say they are wrong. Obviously they feel it more than you if they are willing to end their life for their god. You truly are patheic Donsands

      1. Ian Vincent says:

        GE 1:3-5 On the first day, God created light, then separated light and darkness.
        GE 1:14-19 The sun (which separates night and day) wasn’t created until the fourth day.

        GE 1:11-12, 26-27 Trees were created before man was created.
        GE 2:4-9 Man was created before trees were created.
        Re:

        GE 1:20-21, 26-27 Birds were created before man was created.
        GE 2:7, 19 Man was created before birds were created.

        GE 1:24-27 Animals were created before man was created.
        GE 2:7, 19 Man was created before animals were created.

        GE 1:26-27 Man and woman were created at the same time.
        GE 2:7, 21-22 Man was created first, woman sometime later.
        .
        .
        .
        .

        Millions of intelligent people have read and noted these things and none of them thought that the fact that Moses a few times repeats things means that Moses was stupid. It’s just repetition for the purpose of further elaboration.

  33. So, what’s the general concensus?

    I’ve skimmed about a dozen blogs and the spectrum of opinions are similar to the ones on this blog. Would someone like to post a neutral synopsis of the major talking points? If nobody else volunteers, I’ll give it a shot if the crowd thinks it might be interesting or worthwhile.

  34. Kyle Huckeba says:

    HAHA, i like how you all can speak your minds on here. But i can’t, cause you, whoever you are, are deleting my comments. Just goes to show how insecure you all are.

  35. donsands says:

    Kyle,

    The Scriptures are proven to be authentic. Jesus Christ is a historic figure, and He died for the sins of the world. And He rose again from the dead, as DR. Luke has written:

    “In the first book, O Theophilus, I have dealt with all that Jesus began to do and teach, until the day when he was taken up, after he had given commands through the Holy Spirit to the apostles whom he had chosen. He presented himself ALIVE to them after his suffering by MANY PROOFS, appearing to them during forty days and speaking about the kingdom of God.” Book of Acts 1:1-3

    You’re in dire straits, and you need Christ. He is full of compassion and grace, and will forgive all who come to Him in repentance.

    “Taste and see that the Lord is good. Blessed is the man who trusts in Him.”

    The Church is not perfect, and many in the Church are not genuine Christians, who love Christ. But there are many throughout history who have loved the Lord, and have wonderful testimonies.

    You have a lot of bitterness in you. I pray the Lord would convict you, and bring you to see the truth. Amen.

  36. donsands says:

    “..such a conclusion precludes the possibility of God having had the power to bring about a better situation in which such things were avoided.”

    To be honest “fellow human” I don’t understand what you’re saying.

    I’m simply stating the truth from what we have in the Scriptures.

    God created Adam. God knew the future. Adam sinned. God was grieved. This is the clear truth of the Word.

    For me there’s surely a mystery to this, as there is to the truth of a Triune God, and also that God had no beginning. That to me is the greatest mystery, that the Lord had no beginning.

    It’s been nice. Have a good day.

    1. Kyle Huckeba says:

      Donsands,
      I just honestly think it is ridiculous to state that the bible is true. Its just crazy concept. Anyone can write words on a tablet and have it passed through time to have it later called “authentic>” And as stupid to you as it may sound, 4 guys can get together and write the same book as viewed in another set of eyes. I think the main reason why you think i am so “In need of Christ” is because i have been scarred in every wrong way with religion. I don’t know your past or where you have been, but until you have been shot at, hunted, or blown up by people in the name of their god, you have absolutely no reason to question faith. I guarantee if god was to say, “Blow yourself up for me and reap the rewards in heaven” none of you would do it. So i find it intruiging that an islamic person would go to such lengths for the love that he has for his god. It just makes me question every other religion. I can also bet that you are sitting there reading this and saying, “well christianity is the only true faith cause the bible says!” Bullshit. That just goes back to the fact that you are close minded and are brainwashed to think that the bible is 100%. We all know that Scientology and Mormon and other religions that have just popped up in the last 200 years are just man made. But what about the fact that there were many religions that were around atleast 1000 years before christ, that had there own jesus and the same things that took place in the bible, took place in these religions. THose have been historically proven that it is in written context and so on. Well enough rambling, it probably won’t sink into your hard skull. One last thing though, you told me i have a lot of bitterness in me. I hate religion with all my heart as you love your god. Its has done good for this world, but it has poisoned and destroy life for years.

  37. Ian Vincent says:

    I think that the premise, Does God hate Haiti? is stepping off on the wrong premise, it’s the wrong question.

    God hates sin. God so loved the world… and as far as we know He still does.

    He’s going to pour out His wrath all over this earth, one third of humanity will be killed.

    So, let man foolishly judge God, put Him in the dock, or let us judge ourselves and we won’t be judged.

    1. Kyle Huckeba says:

      “So, let man foolishly judge God, put Him in the dock, or let us judge ourselves and we won’t be judged.”

      I am very impressed. I think more christians should listen you what you have to say.

  38. donsands says:

    “Anyone can write words on a tablet and have it passed through time to have it later called “authentic>”

    No, I don’t think so.

    The Scriptures are incredible evidence for who Jesus Christ. if you take the time to check out the authenticity of the Bible, I believe you will see that it’s not just another book.

    There’s so much i could say about all the manuscripts and all that, but this isn’t the right place for that.

    There are good men in the Church who would be glad to discuss how genuine the Bible has been found to be. You can even check with the Library of Congress.

    I can’t say I enjoyed some of your more salty language, which I’m surprised Justin allowed, to be honest. but, I at one time had such a vocabulary, and even blasphemed the Lord’s name.

    There is really is a God, and He revealed himself in Jesus Christ, who died, and rose from the dead three days later. There are very strong evidences for this truth.
    Nevertheless, you have to ask the lord for the faith to believe it. he will answer all who come to Him, and He will give rest to any sinners heart.
    Life will still be difficult, and even more difficult in some ways, but the joy from knowing Christ and His love is beyond and happiness in this world. Also the peace Christ gives is not like the world’s peace. And His sorrow is a deeper sorrow than this world’s as well.

    Lord bless you, and help you, is my prayer for you Kyle.

  39. Kyle Huckeba says:

    Well have a good and prosperous life donsands. I am living life to the fullest because i know it only last for this life time. peace

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Justin Taylor, PhD


Justin Taylor is executive vice president of book publishing and book publisher for Crossway and blogs at Between Two Worlds. You can follow him on Twitter.

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