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With most major colleges getting whipped into a full frenzy, I thought it would be worthwhile to dust off a few thoughts about binge drinking on our nation’s campuses. Most students won’t have to look hard for opportunities to drink over the next days and weeks (and months and semesters). They may have to go somewhere off campus to party, but the party scene comes recruiting right to them. Some students arrive at college looking to make their Party U dreams come true. Others just find themselves all alone and eager to fit in and make friends. The sad reality is that choices made in the first weeks (or even days) of college can set a trajectory that’s hard to break.

Which means churches and Christian groups must bend over backward to meet, greet, invite, and include. It also means churches must be ready to winsomely and courageously confront the university lifestyle when it is inconsistent with Christian commitment. Many professing Christians will live duplicitous lives–getting smashed on the weekends while still trying to be the good Christian boy or girl their parents and ministry friends imagine them to be. The problem is huge and anyone wishing to minister to college students needs to think about a biblical approach.

Here are a few suggestions on how to begin formulating a Christian response to drinking on our college campuses.

1. Know what you’re up against. Like a good AA course, the first step is admitting we have a problem. Binge drinking is so bad that when researches tried using Breathalyzers at parties and bars it only encouraged students to drink more. No matter how many bad consequences are put in front of students–drunk driving, addictions, unwanted sexual intercourse, unwanted pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, decreased performance in school–they don’t offset the two perceived benefits of drinking: it’s liberating and a good excuse.

Students thinking of alcohol as “liquid courage.” It makes them more fun, more adventurous, less tied to inhibitions. On the latter, drinking is seen as a convenient way of avoiding personal responsibility. The sober girl who hooks up with a complete stranger might be considered a slut. But if she’s drunk, then it’s not really a mark on her character; she just had a few too many. Likewise, many students feel justified if they miss class or perform poorly because of a hangover. No matter what people tell them about the possible dangers of drinking, getting drunk for many college students, is the best way to have fun. And whatever negative consequences may come, these are thought to reflect on the alcohol not on the individual.

Take almost any college in the country, especially the big state schools, and I can just about guarantee that the biggest obstacle to Christian discipleship is not Richard Dawkins or Bart Ehrman or all the heady objections to Christianity that our apologetics are meant to counter. We need apologetics. I’m 100% for taking every thought captive to Christ. But for most 17-22 year-olds the most common temptations to sin are alcohol and sex. Even when there are intellectual objections to Christianity, these are often just cover for a debauched lifestyle. Tens of thousands of college students will walk away from the church this year, or never give it a chance, because their main goal each week is to get smashed and hook up. Rare is the campus ministry that needs to talk about Derrida more than drunkenness.

2. Demonstrate a mature attitude toward alcohol. Some Christians go farther than Scripture in condemning alcohol. The Bible celebrates wine as a gift from God (Isa. 55:1; John 2:9) and good for your stomach (1 Timothy 5:23). I’m not convinced that the Lord’s Supper was strictly the unfermented stuff (1 Cor. 11:21). But let’s not trade one overreach for another. Christians who enjoy good gift of wine or beer need to grow up at times. Christian upperclassmen (and other adults) who can drink legally should be careful with alcohol consumption around underage believers. They should not talk about beer like it’s the coolest thing since Don Draper. If you think not drinking gets you closer to God, get a better reading of Scripture. If you think drinking gets you closer to relevance, get a better understanding of ministry. Christian liberty is no reason for social life and conversation to revolve around the conspicuous consumption of alcohol.

3. Be boldly biblical. There is good wisdom in admonishing sinners by presenting the negative consequences of sin. “You reap what you sow” is how the Bible puts it. So it’s appropriate to warn binge drinkers of STD’s and addictions and DUI’s and scrambling your brains on a car antenna (I won’t go into details, but it was the most disturbing story I heard while I was in college). And yet, the Bible doesn’t just say, “Stop getting drunk because it will hurt you.” It also says, “Stop getting drunk because God hates it.” Drunkards do not inherit the kingdom of heaven (1 Cor. 6:10). Drunkards do not belong in the church’s fellowship (1 Cor. 5:11). Of course, there is forgiveness for the sin of drunkenness. But the Bible repeatedly rebukes those who seek after this sin. Woe to those who run after strong drink, Isaiah says (5:11). Do not get drunk, is Paul’s command (Eph. 5:18). This is what God has to say about the tradition of partying every weekend while in college: “Let us walk properly as in the daytime, not in orgies and drunkenness, not in sexual immorality and sensuality, not in quarreling and jealousy. But put on the Lord Jesus Christ, and make no provision for the flesh, to gratify its desires” (Rom. 13:13-14).

4. Show tough love. There’s a fine line between caring for your drunken friend (who may legitimately hurt himself or others) and enabling sin. Don’t let friends drink and drive and don’t let friends crack their skulls open (I saw people come close in college). But don’t feel sorry for the weekend warriors. Don’t pick up all their messes or remove all their consequences. This line from a 2011 USA Today article has stuck with me: “The campus environment provides so much social support that even when students have bad experiences drinking, the help they get from friends afterward is seen as a positive.” If you are interested in real community, take a risk and show some tough love.

5. Remind the Christians who they are. I realize that many of the binge drinkers have nothing to do with Christianity. But in many parts of the country, the average college student claims some Christian affiliation. Press home their profession of Christ. Tell them what it means to be a new creation. Help them see who they are in Christ. Show them that because they are joined to Christ they take Christ with them to get hammered and get in bed with someone. Teach them again all the good news of Christ crucified for sinners and Christ raised for newness of life. Then implore them to live as if they actually believed what they say they believe.


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44 thoughts on “Christ Did Not Die for You to Do Keg Stands”

  1. Nick Molick says:

    Thank you for this article it is honest powerful and biblical all with Christ’s love throughout. He wants us to flourish, whatever that may look like, but our hearts are bent on our destruction without Him

  2. Shaun Little says:

    Good post Kevin. A little side note on 1 Tim 5:23 was that there was a difference between the wine that was typically consumed in Jesus’ day and the wine we drink now. Namely the pasteurization process we use on wine and beer nowadays kills the beneficial gut flora which was used “for the sake of your stomach”.

    1 Tim 5:23 is one of the main reasons I don’t buy into the unfermented grape juice theory. Those beneficial microbes grow in the fermentation progress and have been used for centuries to treat stomach issues. Raw grape juice mostly lacks this quality and does not carry the same benefit to the stomach as properly fermented grape juice.

  3. Gary Cooper says:

    if you think not drinking gets you closer to God, get a better reading of Scripture. If you think drinking gets you closer to relevance, get a better understanding of ministry.
    I really like this part!!!!

  4. joe says:

    This post has some good points. But never deeply touches on why people binge drink. It’s so easy to say “Yes binge drinking is bad and has no place in your life if you value your relationship with Christ.” It just seems like a rehash of “sin is bad and you shouldn’t do it.” Why do people do things that hurt themselves? In my opinion (and personal experience) people binge drink because they have an underlying pain, a self-loathing that they might not even be aware of. It could be from past wounds, relationships, or just learned behavior to numb oneself if they feel uncomfortable with their own lives. Until the community of believers address the deep and complicated aspects of wounds/pain, for someone who binge drinks, rehashing: “this is wrong” even with scripture isn’t going to change someone’s behavior. Obviously only Christ and that person can really change their behavior, but I think to that starts with addressing it in a small group setting with fellow believers/close friends or therapy.

  5. Chris Vieira says:

    Excellent article Pastor Kevin!

  6. Hal says:

    Joe, Please, man. Give us a break. We’ve all got pain, and the church is constantly “addressing pain.” Stop kidding yourself. 1 Jn 1:6-10, Joe.

  7. WB says:

    Don’t disagree with any of this and yet there’s still a burden placed on believers who drink – “don’t talk about it…” Heaven forbid a fellow discuss his favorite stouts and bourbons with a friend.

  8. Kevin DeYoung says:

    WB, that’s a fair point. I don’t have a problem with people who have their favorite drinks and like to talk about it, provided they are mindful of the company they are in.

  9. WB says:

    KDY – fair enough. Thanks for the clarification, and yet it feels as though those who imbibe must always be on the lookout, not only for a brother prone to indulgence but also to a Church Lady who would be offended at the sight of a wine glass. I admit I long for the day when someone pens a piece urging graciousness on the part of those who abstain towards those who enjoy the modest pleasure of a drink.

  10. Thetan says:

    @WB, What I’ve experienced, the majority of my generation (Gen Y or Millennial who grew up strict Christian) doesn’t look at drinking alcohol as sinning, we look at getting drunk as a sin, as it is. Our fundamental-ish parents taught us to stay away from alcohol and drugs but more importantly they taught us to read the Bible and learn how to think for ourselves. Because of this we do talk about a nice Scotch that just hit the shelves or a great craft beer with an excellent IPA. But on the opposite side, we don’t flaunt the fact we drink and we definitely would never encourage our friends who don’t want imbibe to do so. But we’re not going to hide it like it’s a secret sin. Sometimes there’s silent judgement from a teetotaler church buddy and sometimes there’s there’s that “one guy” that you don’t want to associate with because they go overboard but all in all, it’s becoming less of an issue for those my age within my community of believers.

    I agree with this article though, I think it’s definitely a correct assumption about many in my generation. Sex and alcohol is where it’s at.

  11. Moses Park says:

    Pastor Kevin, I wish you had written this article many years ago when I was still in college myself… I look forward to passing this onto fellow college pastors and campus ministers. Thanks for urging people towards holiness and grounding it in biblical truth.

  12. Britain says:

    I appreciate the article. But I had thoughts about the drinking issue that I feel weren’t addressed here. Many times Christians who do not drink alcohol are put under pressure to drink by people who know that the Bible does not strictly condemn it. I truly believe that is sin. I personally believe that if a Christian (or anyone for that matter) chooses not to drink alcohol, it is not Christ-like to guilt-trip them into doing it. But even though I have trouble admitting it, that logically means Christians who do not drink cannot guilt-trip people who drink into not doing it. Logically that would be sin as well.

    If I had to turn this into a short bullet point it would be this: No one is allowed to guilt-trip you into drinking or not drinking.

  13. anaquaduck says:

    Belteshazzar, Shadrach, Meshach & Abednego (Dan:1) would see no need for the choice food or fine wine. Noah should be wary, Isaiah may say taste & see. There may be many occasions for a drink but not to get drunk. The dangers of a drinking culture can sneek up on you. Two full strength beers or wine & I am pretty relaxed but thats my limit.

  14. Libby says:

    I think it is good to note that there are over 70 verses against alcohol, so context is king on the use of wine and strong drink.
    If the passover (Lord’s Supper) is to be free of yeast/leaven, then most likely non-alcoholic, there is yeast in fermentation.
    Also, Jesus made miracle wine to manifest his glory, but the context is that the people had “already drank freely,” so this *may* mean they had been drinking nonalcoholic since drunkenness is a sin and Jesus would not have made “stronger alcohol content ” to make them even more drunk. Or, it could be the other way around.

    Is “tipsy” or “relaxed” or ” a buzz” or more “open” being under an influence?
    So many brothers and sisters are coming to Christ out of a lifestyle of drinking and partying — let’s keep them in mind and be willing to forego the drink so as not to make a brother or sister stumble. It’s just using some wisdom and love for another.
    Just think on it.

  15. Rachel says:

    My main problem with this article: the assumption that drinking leads to jumping into bed with people. Plenty of people enjoy drinking with their friends and not hooking up after.

  16. Bob says:

    I think the author should throw a party that would be even more fun than the parties he’s denouncing.

  17. Kyle says:

    Great post and very true. Thanks.

  18. John Myer says:

    Though I wouldn’t want to throw a blanket statement of any sort over this issue, one possible factor is the number of youth who are products of Christian culture, but not of the kingdom. I’ve been involved with both undergraduate and graduate ministry for most of my life (now pastoring a church of graduate students). For many years I’ve tried, with only trickles of success, to address the binge drinking, howling, barking at the moon stuff. This year we’re going to minister directly to a growing at-risk group–typical young Midwest “Christians”–and explore why some have such a numbness within. Hopefully, for those who aren’t actually born again, they’ll find a faith that belongs to them. The rest will perhaps find something better to be filled with than the bottomless keg.

    http://www.bareknuckle.org

  19. Kathy McDaniel says:

    @rachael, you stated that the article focuses too much on the correlation that alcohol consumption automatically makes people jump into bed, and you disagree with that. In all my years of working with teens and college students, the ones who end up with an unwanted pregnancy, or an STD, 95% of the time alcohol or drugs were involved. They lower inhibitions, remove the “consequences” mindset, and being drunk or high usually includes poor decision making. That is the scary part. I know people who got drunk one night, list their virginity, ended up pregnant, or with an STD even though they were solid about saving themselves for marriage. When I ask them what their advice is for other kids? “Don’t Drink!” Is the #1 answer! It doesn’t mean that you WILL hook up, it’s just that the potential for making poor choices is much greater.
    KDY-great article!

  20. Laila says:

    The guilt-tripping in this article makes me want to take a shot or three.

  21. Tammy says:

    Libby I agree with you!

  22. Phil says:

    A hurtfully out of touch blog about college parties from an adult named Kevin who is a pastor who lives near a state school in Michigan.

  23. Ben says:

    Hi, jew atheist here.

    Be careful when you imply that alcoholism is a deliberate, controllable, fun dirty little sin, and that all that alcoholics need to do is let God into their lives, quit drinking, and get their shit together. Then they can go to heaven.
    When you say:

    it might give the impression that you don’t consider alcoholism an uncontrollable disease. Which is pretty insensitive. If alcoholics could just give up drinking, then they probably weren’t alcoholics to begin with. Surely you’ll agree that alcoholism is an illness.

    I’d say it’s fairly offensive, and pretty ridiculous, to assume that:

    . What do you know about my (or other peoples’) intellectual objections to Christianity? What if I can openly admit that I have intellectual objections to religion AND have an enjoyable, extremely fulfilling debauched lifestyle?

    … And when you write that you are “100% for taking every thought captive to Christ”, it just gets creepy, and it reminds me of another useless stalemate of Religious Steadfastness vs Hitchens/Dawkins

    PS – Jesus was definitely drinking during the Bible.
    Also I thought the whole thing was that christ DID die for our sins….

  24. Ben says:

    wow i brutally misused the block quote HTML tag feature on my above comment, and for that I apologize.
    but you get what I’m saying

  25. nate says:

    “But for most 17-22 year-olds the most common temptations to sin are alcohol and sex.” — Somehow I don’t agree with this statement. Maybe the sex/sexual temptation/lust, but I really don’t think alch is a greater temptation than, say, jealousy, laziness, etc.

  26. Ben says:

    Whew, goddamn, i really blew it with that block quote business . Let’s try this again, this time, sans the block quote formatting! Here we go:

    Hi, it’s me, Ben, the jewish atheist from the last two poorly formatted comments above. Remember me?

    Please be careful when you imply that alcoholism is a deliberate, controllable, fun, dirty little sin, and that all that alcoholics need to do is let some God into their lives, stop drinking, and get their shit together. Then they can go to heaven.
    When you say:
    “The Bible doesn’t just say, ‘Stop getting drunk because it will hurt you.’ It also says, ‘Stop getting drunk because God hates it.’ Drunkards do not inherit the kingdom of heaven (1 Cor. 6:10). Drunkards do not belong in the church’s fellowship (1 Cor. 5:11)”
    it might give the impression that you don’t consider alcoholism an uncontrollable disease. Which is pretty insensitive. If alcoholics could just give up drinking, then they probably weren’t alcoholics to begin with. Surely you’d agree that alcoholism is an illness.

    I’d say it’s fairly offensive, and pretty ridiculous, for you to assume that:
    “Even when there are intellectual objections to Christianity, these are often just cover for a debauched lifestyle”.
    What do you know about my (or other peoples’) intellectual objections to Christianity? What if I can openly admit that I have intellectual objections to religion AND have an enjoyable, extremely fulfilling debauched lifestyle?

    … And then when you go on to say that you are “100% for taking every thought captive to Christ”, it just gets creepy, and it reminds me of another useless stalemate of Religious Steadfastness vs Hitchens/Dawkins

    PS – Jesus was definitely drinking during the Bible.
    Also I thought the whole thing was that christ DID die for our sins….

  27. Rick says:

    I agree with Nate above; this problem is visible, but is not the norm. I work on a huge campus (25,000+ students) and frankly the binge drinking is confined to a small group of people. To think that all college students are hard-partying hedonists is as erroneous as thinking televangelists represent all evangelicals. The number of college students who do conventional things like quietly attend class, do their homework, work part-time, and prepare for careers is far larger than the loud frat-boy culture that drinks all weekend. Articles like this simply take a caricature and assume it applies to huge numbers of real people, and worse, it assumes the worst about an entire generation. If you are trying to actually reach 20-somethings, writings like this don’t help you at all.

  28. John K says:

    @Ben “it might give the impression that you don’t consider alcoholism an uncontrollable disease. Which is pretty insensitive. If alcoholics could just give up drinking, then they probably weren’t alcoholics to begin with. Surely you’d agree that alcoholism is an illness.” Certainly Kevin doesn’t consider it a completely uncontrollable disease. Though I admit he should have made a call for binge drinkers to get help, because certainly many people can’t lick it alone, Christian or not.

    “What do you know about my (or other peoples’) intellectual objections to Christianity? What if I can openly admit that I have intellectual objections to religion AND have an enjoyable, extremely fulfilling debauched lifestyle?” Maybe he’s speaking about other people’s from his own conversations and ministry experience. Maybe he’s also considering the latter half of Romans 1, the latter part of Romans 13, and such passages.…

    “And then when you go on to say that you are “100% for taking every thought captive to Christ”, it just gets creepy, and it reminds me of another useless stalemate of Religious Steadfastness vs Hitchens/Dawkins” I guess you thought it was creepy when Paul said it in II Corinthians 10:5 as well.

    “Also I thought the whole thing was that christ DID die for our sins….” Certainly if a binge drinker repents and believes in Jesus, then their sins are covered But not people who claim to be Christians and yet make no effort to repent. I Corinthians 6:9-10 makes both these points.

  29. Cassandra Wright says:

    It has been a LONG TIME since I went to a bonafide party school. I grew up in an alcohol free home, so this was my first real exposure to drinking, and it was not one that made me want to have anything to do with it. Hearing people talk on Monday morning about how sick they were after having a great time that they could not remember made no sense to me at all. It still doesn’t, and after 37 yrs or marriage, I still run a dry home! I don’t think our son drinks much, if at all. I fee like Paul when he says that he wished Christians would not marry, but knew that some would need to. I wish Christians would not drink, but I know some will – it isn’t my call. If someone likes some wine, ok. But what I hate is that most Christians will respond to my thought with the statement that Jesus drank wine. Ahhh – you want to be more like Jesus? Do you know that he probably didn’t wear underwear or shoes and socks? That he wore His hair in the Jewish style? Didn’t use anti-perspirant? Walked every where? Well, why are you so willing to be like Him by drinking wine but not by doing those other things that were part of His everyday life? I don’t think most underage drinkers have any excuse to drink other than wanting to be cool. They don’t understand that being acceptable by people is insignificant compared to be acceptable by God. No one is getting tossed out of Heaven because they had a glass of wine with dinner or a beer with a pizza. When our young people are more interested in being acceptable in each other’s eyes, the Church has lost something important.

  30. Roman says:

    “Even when there are intellectual objections to Christianity, these are often just cover for a debauched lifestyle. Tens of thousands of college students will walk away from the church this year, or never give it a chance, because their main goal each week is to get smashed and hook up.”

    I took a class with Bart Ehrman at UNC, a school where students both party and study hard. I can say for damn sure that I did not leave the church because of Ehrman’s class (though I thoroughly enjoyed it, as he is a great lecturer), or because I liked alcohol. I left because “Christians” like you have a holier than thou attitude and shame others. Why don’t you examine yourselves before you begin painting a caricature of non-christian (or what your idea of non-christian is) college students that is both patronizing and simplistic? Maybe students are leaving the church because YOU are doing something wrong. But of course, it’s easier to say they’re the problem than to actually self-reflect.

  31. John says:

    Binge drinking does not mean they’re not Christian. Being Christ-like during church activities and not being Christ-like does not mean they’re not Christian. Getting drunk is a sin. Like any other sin, the only one to judge is God. Being Christian should mean you know right from wrong – but I think you missed the whole message of being Christian. Shouldn’t you love others regardless of their sins instead of telling them they’re not Christian or going to go to hell for their actions (FYI – it’s not your place to judge them in the first place)?

  32. John says:

    “If you are interested in real community, take a risk and show some tough love.” In other words, judge them for they sinned. OKAY!

  33. Jon says:

    I shared a lot of detractors’ concerns on first opening this article. But, I started to see the nuances coming through, and I appreciated them. full disclosure: Christian who can’t drink here (allergic to alcohol). I’m also a huge believer in Christian liberty, and I absolutely think that there is nothing inherent about not drinking that makes you a better Christian. That attitude is thoroughly holier-than-thou, as Kevin and some comments here have mentioned.

    But though the pastor may have used some more definitive language than I would about the habits of college students (the statistics are not totally against him though, but since no one has cited any studies I will make no further assertions). Here’s my problem with binge drinking: the health risks. As our atheist Jewish friend (if I may presume) mentioned, alcoholism is serious. It’s not a matter of willpower, it’s chemical. And you don’t even need to be addicted to suffer serious ill effects from binge drinking. It’s bad news, and it’s not just the churches harping on its prevalence.

    Think of this as Kevin providing another biblical justification for why binge drinking can be counterproductive to a Christian’s pursuit of God. It’s not that drinking is inherently wrong, but that there are risks to both health and spiritual health (as there are with many things in life).

    I don’t think the pastor has attempted to provide a comprehensive “How to eradicate the binge drinking scourge” manual. It’s just a perspective on a particular viewpoint in some Christian circles. Take it for what is, and then maybe let it inspire you to take stock of your own life. Isn’t that what all good and useful perspectives should do?

  34. lew says:

    As a person known to have over indulged alcohol in past years, this is about obedience and being sober. Jesus said were to obey. Paul says don’t be drunk, Peter says were to obey. Binge drinking or not admitting you have a drinking is sin whether its ‘liberty’ or not. Christ said obey. I do have a drink maybe one per day avg, but not drunkardness or binge which is drunkardness as well.

  35. Michael H says:

    When it comes to alcohol, especially in the context of the local church and families, what you permit in moderation your children will indulge in excess. While you cite the medicinal and cultural acceptance of alcohol, you fail to cite that “wine is a mocker and beer is a brawler; whoever is led away by them is not wise” (Prov 20:1). As a pastor, you reckless acceptance of moderate alcohol consumption – on social media, no less! – is as wise as a youth pastor driving a teenage girl home by himself after a youth activity. Wrong? Maybe not. Unwise? Most definitely. Pastor DeYoung, I humbly ask that you get wisdom!

  36. Jonathan says:

    Bringing back prohibition would be a good idea now. Alcohol is a scourge on civilization. The problems it causes, the deaths, the misery, the suffering, the victims…. It all far outweighs any perceived benefit of taking such drinks.

  37. Deb says:

    This is an interesting and helpful article on the whole, but I think we would be well served to look at the scripture’s teaching with regard to the premises of this article.

    Given Paul’s address to the Corinthian church, I would argue that the relationship between young adults gravitating toward the debauched lifestyle and the underlying worldviews of atheism and postmodernism actually go hand in hand with each other.

    A culture given over to debauchery is symptomatic of large scale worship disorder. Young people in that lifestyle are simply living out the logical progression of a worldview that has taught them: eat, drink and be merry, for tomorrow we die (ref: 1 Cor 15:32).

    Paul even seems to tie the two together in verse 34 when he writes, “Come back to your senses as you ought, and stop sinning; for there are some who are ignorant of God—I say this to your shame.”

    As John Piper wrote, Missions exist because worship of the true God doesn’t. Thus, our approach needs to address both of these areas equally, otherwise we err to one side or the other — giving young adults the idea that we are moralists “Don’t do this, don’t do that” or that our faith is vacuous and of no value in the “real world”.

  38. Sam says:

    Great points and I am so grateful to see all these people who seeks holiness of God and lead people to Christ.

    Here is my take on this.

    As the Scripture condemns “drunkenness” which is a result from drinking…why don’t we all set our hearts to God and not drink?
    If you are a Christian and truly know the love of God in Christ, who gave up his LIFE for you, is letting go of drinking such a big of a deal to you? A bottle of beer, or a glass of wine, or a shot of scotch….but if you truly revere and love God, can’t you just lay it down? I am asking this question based on my experience. I once was a hardcore party guy, throwing my life for nothing…but Christ saved me from all those things and my sin. letting go of drinking was NOTHING for me….

  39. Thank you so much for this! As a seminary student who is about to begin working closely with the college minister at my church, I am quite aware that I will be dealing with the issue of alcohol frequently. I appreciate your desire to deal with the topic biblically rather than emotionally or according to long-held traditions.

  40. Rachael says:

    I would love to know how Christians can honestly use Biblical references to wine as an excuse to drink any kind of alcohol they wish? If you’re going to insist that the wine in the Bible is equivalent to the wine of today, fine – however, that limits you to drinking wine. The verses about strong drink are undisputed, and there are never any positive references to strong drink. It seems easy to me that’s the best way to avoid binge drinking is not to drink it all. You gave a lot of great information on your article that showed basically no positive qualities of drinking. Why must Christians have everything in the world has?

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Kevin DeYoung


Kevin DeYoung is senior pastor of University Reformed Church (PCA) in East Lansing, Michigan, near Michigan State University. He and his wife Trisha have six young children. You can follow him on Twitter.

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