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It’s a figure of speech to look at things “upside down” in order to get some perspective. But what if there’s more here than just a clever turn of phrase? What if we can’t actually see our world in proper perspective unless we’ve seen it upside down?

Assisi Upside Down

This is precisely the point that G. K. Chesterton makes in his biography of Francis of Assisi. Seeing the world upside down means seeing its utter dependence on God, and with that sense of dependence comes a greater love for this world because of the adventure of its own existence. He writes:

If a man saw the world upside down, with all the trees and towers hanging head downwards as in a pool, one effect would be to emphasize the idea of dependence. There is a Latin and literal connection; for the very word dependence only means hanging. It would make vivid the Scriptural text which says that God has hanged the world upon nothing.

If St. Francis saw in one of his strange dreams, the town of Assisi upside down, it need not have differed in a single detail from itself except in being entirely the other way round. But the point is this: that whereas to the normal eye the large masonry of its walls or the massive foundations of its watchtowers and its high citadel would make it seem safer and more permanent, the moment it was turned over the very same weight would make it seem more helpless and more in peril. It is but a symbol; but it happens to fit the psychological fact.

St. Francis might love his little town as much as before, or more than before; but the nature of the love would be altered even in being increased. He might see and love every tile on the steep roofs or every bird on the battlements; but he would see them all in a new and divine light of eternal danger and dependence. Instead of being merely proud of his strong city because it could not be moved, he would be thankful to God Almighty that it had not been dropped; he would be thankful to God for not dropping the whole cosmos like a vast crystal to be shattered into falling stars. Perhaps St. Peter saw the world so, when he was crucified head-downwards.

Gratitude and Dependence

What happens when our love for God and the world increases in proportion to our realization of utter dependence on God? We are filled with gratitude. Chesterton goes on:

It is commonly in a somewhat cynical sense that men have said, “Blessed is he that expects nothing, for he shall not be disappointed”. It was in a wholly happy and enthusiastic sense that St. Francis said. “Blessed is he who expects nothing, for he shall enjoy everything”.

It was by this deliberate idea of starting from zero, from the dark nothingness of his own deserts, that he did come to enjoy even earthly things as few people have enjoyed them; and they are in themselves the best working example of the idea. For there is no way in which a man can earn a star or deserve a sunset. But there is more than this involved, and more indeed than is easily to be expressed in words. It is not only true that the less a man thinks of himself, the more he thinks of his good luck and of all the gifts of God. It is also true that he sees more of the things themselves when he sees more of their origin; for their origin is a part of them and indeed the most important part of them.

The Truth about Our World

Seeing the world upside down is not a trick. It is not an illusion or the result of an overactive imagination. Recognizing the world’s awesomeness and fragility — this grandeur held together by the breath of the Creator — is seeing reality. Ordinariness is the delusion of self-sufficiency; when we look at the world upside down, we actually see it right side up.

That we all depend in every detail, at every instant, as a Christian would say upon God, as even an agnostic would say upon existence and the nature of things, is not an illusion of imagination; on the contrary, it is the fundamental fact which we cover up, as with curtains, with the illusion of ordinary life. That ordinary life is an admirable thing in itself, just as imagination is an admirable thing in itself. But it is much more the ordinary life that is made of imagination than the contemplative life. He who has seen the whole world hanging on a hair of the mercy of God has seen the truth; we might almost say the cold truth. He who has seen the vision of his city upside-down has seen it the right way up.


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6 thoughts on “Why You Should (Literally) Look at the World Upside Down”

  1. Rachel says:

    Great quotes! I like “the moment it was turned over the very same weight would make it seem more helpless and more in peril… Instead of being merely proud of his strong city because it could not be moved, he would be thankful to God Almighty that it had not been dropped.”

  2. The world upside down is pןɹoʍ ǝɥʇ.

    1. Now *this* is an appropriate use of the word “literally.” I only clicked on the article because the title had me intrigued: how could turning upside down, or flipping over a globe/map, help me? Maybe there will be some interesting psychological benefit.

      Nope. Instead, a (metaphorical) butchering of a word. :)

      1. Trevin Wax says:

        This comment *literally* made my day. ;-)

    2. Christiane says:

      Hi BOB CLEVELAND,
      of all Southern Baptists I am familiar with, you are one that I would have marked as having a Franciscan heart. I think I was right. :) (Strangely, another one is C.B., but he wouldn’t admit it.)

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Trevin Wax


​Trevin Wax is Bible and Reference Publisher at LifeWay Christian Resources and managing editor of The Gospel Project. You can follow him on Twitter or receive blog posts via email. Click here for Trevin’s full bio.

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